Partial list of Microsoft pharmacy ads identified as acting illegally

In our report released today, we take a look at several bing.com Internet pharmacy ads for fake or rogue Internet pharmacies. Here’s a quick list of the ten rogue Internet pharmacies we focused on in the report, and what they are doing wrong.

  • choice-rx.com. This Internet pharmacy does not require a prescription and sells drugs purportedly from India or the Seychelles. The order is processed by a website in Panama sponsored by Russian company. The website is registered to Joel Troska of Minnesota.
  • k2med.com. This fake Internet pharmacy linked to a Russian organized crime group called “33 Drugs” fraudulently advertises under the name “dailymedrx.com,” a licensed Internet pharmacy in Indiana.
  • canadian-healthcare-shop.com. Some Microsoft advertisements for canadadrugs.com or prescriptionpoint.com fraudulently redirect to this no-prescription-required website controlled by a Russian spam network.
  • expressdelivery.biz. This rogue websites advertises under affordabledrugs.com, but redirects to expressdelivery.biz. The website claims to sell drugs from Canada, but the authors submitted an order, and received counterfeit Cialis, without a prescription from India.
  • bestrxcanada.com. This Microsoft advertiser sells potentially counterfeit drugs, does not require a prescription, and has a connection to Russian organized crime.
  • jutcom.com. This advertiser appears to be a mini search engine, but primarily displays Internet pharmacies selling controlled substances without a prescription.
  • rx-medical-center.com. LegitScript successfully ordered and received a prescription-only prescription muscle relaxant without a prescription from this Microsoft advertiser.
  • toppharmacymulti.com. Controlled by a Russian/Eastern European network, this fake Internet pharmacy has hijacked an advertisement placed by a licensed US pharmacy.
  • genericshotsale.com. This no-prescription-required website is controlled by Russian organized crime, does not require a prescription, and pretends to be “Canadian.”
  • rx-line.com. This Microsoft advertiser is actually based in Calcutta, India, sends potentially counterfeit drugs, and does not require a prescription.